100-day rule for ESAs stresses families out

The dilemma facing them: Money and disruption
or quality education and burdensome costs?

Say you’re a family scrimping and sacrificing, in a still-tight Nevada economy, so your kids can escape some of the worst public schools in the country.

If you suddenly learn that, for each child you have, some $5,000 in state help may be available, you’re going to pay full attention.

Thus, thousands of Nevada private-school parents already are personally investigating and experiencing the Education Savings Account law that Nevada legislators and Gov. Brian Sandoval approved this spring.

But what those parents are finding is that — despite the good intentions behind the legislation — what the law actually offers is something that at least some of them might describe as a deal with the devil.

It offers them a hefty financial incentive if they will abandon, at least for 100 days — the better part of a school year — their private school, and place their children back in the ever-more crowded government-run schools, frequently violent and gang-dominated, and significantly inferior in classroom quality.

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Education

Brian Sandoval, Man of the Hour?

Special session could address ESA legislation’s first-draft problems

Who’s the one man in Nevada with the authority to immediately resolve the problems besetting parents who want to set up Education Savings Accounts?

It’s Gov. Brian Sandoval, who signed the legislation in June.

That’s what Victor Joecks, executive vice president of the Nevada Policy Research Institute told scores of frustrated parents Friday at a regulatory hearing conducted by the Nevada Treasurer’s Office.

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Avid for Stimulus money, pols short-circuited
oversight, got green-energy flops in return

As Obama, Reid tout clean energy at Vegas summit, investigation
shows their involvement in failure of Nevada revolving loan program

When Sen. Harry Reid and President Barack Obama return to Las Vegas Monday for Reid’s 8th Annual National Clean Energy Summit, there’ll be a ghost with them on the dais.

Call it the “Ghost of Stimulus-Act Past.” Or perhaps “The Spirit of Green-Energy Subsidy Failures Past.”

No matter what it’s called, the thing is out of the grave and again stalking the land.

It’s back because every million-dollar-plus renewable-energy loan that Nevada gave to green-energy companies, using its Stimulus Act dollars, subsequently failed and is now the target of “claw back” legal actions by the state.

That’s what an “informational” report deep inside a 54-page “exhibit” given the 2015 Nevada Legislature’s Senate Finance Committee — and turned over to Nevada Journal by a concerned lawmaker — says.

Of $13.8 million loaned out by the state, the cumulative amount not remitted, according to legislative staff, exceeded $12.2 million, or something over 88 percent:

When Sen. Harry Reid and President Barack Obama return to Las Vegas Monday for Reid’s 8th Annual National Clean Energy Summit, there’ll be a ghost with them on the dais.

Call it the “Ghost of Stimulus-Act Past.” Or perhaps “The Spirit of Green-Energy Subsidy Failures Past.”

No matter what it’s called, the thing is out of the grave and again stalking the land.

It’s back because every million-dollar-plus renewable-energy loan that Nevada gave to green-energy companies, using its Stimulus Act dollars, subsequently failed and is now the target of “claw back” legal actions by the state.

That’s what an “informational” report deep inside a 54-page “exhibit” given the 2015 Nevada Legislature’s Senate Finance Committee — and turned over to Nevada Journal by a concerned lawmaker — says.

Of $13.8 million loaned out by the state, the cumulative amount not remitted, according to legislative staff, exceeded $12.2 million, or something over 88 percent:

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The work-comp logjam is leaking

Support grows for voluntary alternative to work comp, said better for everyone

Nevada parents demonstrate
massive desire for school choice

Attendance at Treasurer's regulatory workshop overflows even the ‘overflow’ room

Experts: Years of work-comp turmoil ahead

Obamacare seen hurting injured workers' healthcare access, incentivizing provider fraud

DeMint praises Nevada’s ESA law

Says state-based school-choice programs create momentum for national reform

State regulation of work comp
proceeded on tilted playing field

Bad-actor ‘anecdotes’ finally, after decades, granted new credibility

How state lawmakers
broke the ‘Grand Bargain’

Supreme Court: Injured Nevada workers get
merely ‘a hollow and illusory form of relief’

1990s work-comp laws attacked
injured-worker costs on all fronts

State lawmakers gave surprising legal shield
to insurers, administrators who act in bad faith

Political incentives naturally drove
Nevada workers’ comp into the ditch

Lawmakers saw problems with doctors, high court justices

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