Previous Nevada Journal articles

Colorado hash oil explosions triple
with marijuana's legalization

DENVER (AP) — The opening months of Colorado's first-in-the-nation recreational marijuana industry have seen a rise in fiery explosions and injuries as pot users try to make the drug's intoxicating oil in crude home-based laboratories.

Since Jan. 1, when sales began, the state's only certified adult burn center has treated 10 people with serious injuries they suffered while making hash oil, compared with 11 in 2013 and one in 2012.

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In drought, California city
looks again to desalinization

SANTA BARBARA, Calif. (AP) — This seaside city thought it had the perfect solution the last time California withered in a severe drought more than two decades ago: Tap the ocean to turn salty seawater to fresh water.

The $34 million desalination plant ran for only three months until — after a miracle soaking of rain —it was mothballed.

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BLM paramilitaries hit
with police report filings

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Family members and other supporters took a Nevada rancher's grazing rights fight against the U.S. government to the sheriff in Las Vegas on Friday, filing reports alleging crimes by federal agents against people protesting a roundup of cattle from public land.

Rancher Cliven Bundy wasn't among those who filed handwritten complaints with the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department — the agency with jurisdiction over Bundy's ranch in the Bunkerville area and much of Clark County.

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Fiscal

Margin tax could mean the death of
long-time Las Vegas construction firm

Owner sees tax forcing her to shut down, lay off 70 employees

LAS VEGAS — After 16 years, a Las Vegas-based construction company that weathered the Great Recession could be forced to close and layoff its roughly 70 hard-working employees.

Only recently, Renee Newman and her husband had reason to hope that their construction company — which Newman asked not be named publicly for fear of retaliation — could break even and maybe even turn a small profit this year.

Since the economic downturn of 2008 and the accompanying construction-industry crisis, the couple has taken every cost-saving measure possible, from reducing their own pay, to cutting employee salaries, to layoffs. For the past three years, the company has been in the red and Newman’s family has filled the gaps with their own savings.

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Seeing 90% of Nevada illegals fail test,
California DMV, others launch new classes

SANTA ANA, Calif. (AP) — There's a lot riding on a California law to grant driver's licenses to immigrants in the country illegally and supporters are already preparing prospective drivers to pass the test required to get one.

A Mexican consulate is hosting monthly driver's license test preparation classes. A community college is designing a 15-hour course to help immigrants prepare. And the state's Department of Motor Vehicles has put together new audio materials in Spanish with months to go before the new licenses are issued.

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Education, Transparency

Dad told seeing state’s records
on his kids will cost him $10 grand+

Over 800 data points now collected on each Nevada public, charter school student

LAS VEGAS — Would you like to see the information the State of Nevada is keeping on your child?

You may have to take out a loan.

The State Department of Education recently notified one Washoe County parent it would cost him more than $10,000.

When John Eppolito, a parent of four, asked to view the information the state is warehousing on his children, he was informed that "the Department’s Director of Information Technology… has estimated that the cost will be approximately $10,194."

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California bill reignites affirmative action fight

Asian-Americans mobilize against Democrats' party-line vote

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Nearly 20 years after California became the first state to ban the use of race and ethnicity in college admissions, a proposal to reinstate affirmative action has sparked a backlash that is forging a new divide in the state's powerful Democratic Party and creating opportunity for conservatives.

The debate is unfolding in the nation's most populous and most ethnically diverse state as an unrelated U.S. Supreme Court ruling upholds voters' rights to decide whether racial considerations should factor into university selections.

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Rand Paul: School choice issue could
bring minorities aboard GOP

Sen. Paul, admirerCHICAGO (AP) — Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul said voters in perennial Democratic strongholds such as Chicago and Milwaukee will think differently if they see Republicans not just visiting these places, but discussing issues pertinent to their circumstances.

That's the thinking behind the 2016 GOP presidential prospect's current visit to the two Midwestern metropolitan areas, where Paul said the Republican issue of school choice could appeal to minority parents.

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Albuquerque chief has few answers
after latest police shooting

Shooter-cop's body-camera video missing
after 19-year-old woman killed

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A news conference called to address the latest shooting by the troubled Albuquerque Police Department raised more questions than answers Wednesday about the killing of a suspected car thief during a foot chase.

Chief Gorden Eden said police were unable to recover video from the body camera worn by the officer who shot 19-year-old Mary Hawkes. He also said he doesn't yet know if the gun found by her body was loaded, how many times she was shot, whether she had her front or back to the officer when she was killed, if any other officers' cameras captured the event or whether any witnesses have corroborated the officer's statement that the woman pulled a gun on him.

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Courthouse violence unpredictable
despite security improvements

At new Utah federal courthouse, attacking Tongan gang member is shot

Police tape surrounds Salt Lake City federal courthouse.SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — When Utah's new federal courthouse opened last week, it came with security improvements that are becoming standard around the country: separate entrances and elevators for judges, defendants and the public; bullet-resistant glass and paneling; and vehicle barricades to keep car bombs at bay.

Even the design of the courtrooms, with plenty of sunlight and space, can help calm witnesses or defendants in high-stress cases, some judges believe.

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